Appointment to View: The making of the More4 idents

The team at 4Creative have commissioned ManvsMachine to produce a series of colourful idents for the rebranding of the More4 channel. We take a look at how they did it.

More4's new identity is centred around a new logo created from multiple coloured triangles that flip, fold, attract and repel each other into position.

Using their designs for the More4 logo as a base, ManvsMachine commissioned Jason Bruges Studio, along with students from Middlesex University as producers to manufacture, install and maintain 400 moving flipper units.

The 400 mechanical units were transported from the studio to various locations including Dungeness beach and Victoria Park, where they were filmed.

4Creative's Chris Wood, head of on-air promotions More4, said: "From 'Grand Designs', to' River Cottage' – a lot of More4's programming is about making things; so we in turn wanted to physically build these idents, construct them and film them in real locations, rather than computer-generating all the magic in post-production.

"The flipper installations we eventually came up with subtly reinforce the new look, but offer a satisfying spontaneity which, I hope, will make them continually watchable."

The logo, idents, full on-screen identity and package were all created by ManvsMachine and are meant to create a warm feeling for the channel and Guy Connelly from band Clock Opera was commissioned to compose the right music to emphasise this.

The idents aired for the first time on Monday (23 January).


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