A&E/DDB appoints Rebecca Moody as strategy partner

Adam & Eve/DDB has hired the Havas Worldwide London head of planning, Re­becca Moody, as a strategy partner.

A&E/DDB strategist (l-r)...Golding, Moody, Boyd, Bentley
A&E/DDB strategist (l-r)...Golding, Moody, Boyd, Bentley

Her appointment coincides with the promotion of Beth Bentley to deputy head of planning, working alongside the head of planning, Dom Boyd, as Adam & Eve/DDB seeks to bolster its planning department after winning the Grand Prix at the IPA Effectiveness Awards for John Lewis last week.

Moody has worked at Havas Worldwide London since 2008 and was promoted to the position of head of planning in that year after the departure of Alison Ashworth. The agency has yet to appoint a replacement.

David Golding, the founding partner and chief strategy officer at Adam & Eve/DDB, said: "I’m delighted that Rebecca has joined us. She brings a wealth of experience and energy to the team here and will be a great thought leader across our client base. She’s also a lovely person to have around working with us."

Moody began her career at Lowe before moving to Duckworth Finn Grubb Waters. In 2000, Moody joined Abbott Mead Vickers BBDO, where she worked on accounts including the BBC, PepsiCo and Sainsbury’s. Bentley worked on the then Adam & Eve’s launch spot for Google+.

Golding added: "Beth is a brilliant planner, able to inspire big and small brands to really think afresh."

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