Opel selects Vauxhall executive to lead group marketing

Struggling car-maker Opel/Vauxhall has promoted Duncan Aldred to its top marketing job, following the departure of Alfred Rieck after only seven months in the role.

Vauxhall: promotes Duncan Aldred
Vauxhall: promotes Duncan Aldred

Rieck resigned from his position as vice president, sales, marketing and after-sales last week. He joined the General Motors-owned manufacturer in July last year from his role as president of Volkswagen’s Skoda business in China, replacing Alain Visser, who departed for Volvo.

Aldred, currently chairman and managing director of its UK brand Vauxhall, will take on group sales and marketing responsibilities with immediate effect, while continuing to lead the Vauxhall business.

One of Aldred’s biggest decisions since taking over at Vauxhall has been to invest in the title sponsorship of all four home nations’ football associations, including an estimated £25m backing of the England football team.

Opel/Vauxhall has continued to struggle in Europe, with sales declining across the region. In the UK, according to SMMT figures, new car sales fell by 1% year-on-year in comparison to an industry average of 5.3% growth, as the brand fell further behind market leader Ford.

However, the marque is pinning its hopes on the launch of a new series of models, including its Adam city car, which rolls out this year.

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