Pringles to run Fan Versus Flavour digital campaign

Pringles is running an EMEA-wide digital campaign to promote its new Roast Chicken flavour variant, and is to reveal subsequent flavours on its Facebook page.

The digital campaign revolves around a game that introduces a Pringles "fan" character, who will take on further new flavours of the snack in head-to-head challenges.

The 'Fan Versus Flavour' campaign, created by Glue Isobar, builds on the Pringles overarching message of "Bursting with flavour".

It has been created to appeal to a young audience who are fans of social media.

'Fan Versus Flavour' will initially launch on Facebook and YouTube, with a teaser campaign on 1 March, which will introduce the fan character and give a taste of the challenges he will face

A total of four films will be unveiled by Pringles, with consumers invited to guess who will win each challenge, fan or flavour.

The films will be housed on both the Pringles Facebook and YouTube pages and will be supported throughout March by online display, social media and a PR campaign.

'Fan Versus Flavour' marks one of the first significant marketing investments behind the brand since Kellogg swooped to buy the brand from Procter & Gamble for £1.7bn a year ago.

In October last year, Pringles signed a six-figure deal to sponsor peak-time films on Channel 5’s network of TV channels.

Pringles' other flavours include Pringles Original, Sour Cream, Salt & Vinegar, Smokey Bacon and Zesty Lime and Chilli.

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1 Brands that forge an emotional tie are best protected from copycats

Forging an emotional tie with consumers is one of the strongest ways to protect your brand. Products can be copycatted, but the distinctive identity of a true brand can never be replicated argues Nir Wegrzyn, CEO of BrandOpus.

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