Adam Crozier took home £3.2m in 2012

Adam Crozier, the chief executive of ITV, took home a total of £3.15m in 2012, up 13% on 2011 and including more than 90% of his possible bonus, after the broadcaster's pre-tax profits increased by 6%.

Adam Crozier: chief executive of ITV
Adam Crozier: chief executive of ITV

According to ITV’s annual report published this week, Crozier's base salary was £818,000 last year, up 2.5% year on year, while £897,000 as part of short-term incentive schemes, was up 41.5% year on year.

Crozier also received £19,000 worth of benefits in kind, including private medical insurance and car-related benefits, and £74,000 of pension contributions.

As part of longer-term bonus schemes, Crozier was awarded £1.35m in 2012, 91.3% of the maximum available and up 6.1% year on year. Of the long-term bonus, £448,000 was deferred in shares and £897,000 was paid in cash.

Crozier's total pay of £3.15m represented a 12.9% increase from a total of £2.79m in 2011.

Ian Griffiths, the finance director of ITV, earned a total of £1.67m; including £449,000 in base salary, £456,000 in short-term cash incentives, and £683,000 as part of a long-term bonus scheme.

Archie Norman, the chairman of ITV, received £300,000 in 2012, the same as he earned in 2011.

ITV reported profit before tax of £348m in 2012, up 6% year on year and led by double-digit growth in the broadcaster's production and digital revenues, while spot-ad revenues remained flat.

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