Waitrose marketer behind Heston and Delia ads departs

Sarah Fuller, the Waitrose head of marketing who is credited with being one of the key architects behind the Delia Smith and Heston Blumenthal ad campaign, is to leave the retailer after four years.

Sarah Fuller: leaves Waitrose for The Garden Centre Group
Sarah Fuller: leaves Waitrose for The Garden Centre Group

Fuller has been head of marketing at Waitrose since 2010 and oversaw the high-profile campaign using celebrity chefs Smith and Blumenthal. She has also been responsible for the retailer’s CRM, brand strategy and customer events.

She is taking up the role of marketing director at The Garden Centre Group, previously known as Wyevale, where she will lead its marketing communications and its loyalty scheme, The Gardening Club.

Waitrose is now on the hunt for a new  marketing chief. The role reports to the retailer's marketing director Rupert Thomas.

Prior to joining Waitrose, Fuller was director of marketing and insight at Airmiles, a role she held between 2005 and 2008. She previously held the position of head of marketing for the consumer division at Telewest, between 2004 and 2005, before its merger with NTL to form Virgin Media. She began her career at Procter & Gamble.

Earlier this year, Marketing revealed that Waitrose was to drop Smith from its ads, but retain Blumenthal for future marketing.

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