If you're actually working over the summer and need distraction, read on
A view from Russell Davies

If you're actually working over the summer and need distraction, read on

There's an end-of-term feeling around, isn't there? My son's slogging through the last few days of school - that time when you don't do any...

Boardroom TVs and computers are tuned to various summery sports, meetings are moved into parks and squares, every e-mail prompts a thicket of out-of-office replies – most with slightly embarrassed talk of "working from home". I walked past an agency crowd outside a pub recently and heard the phrases "ice-cream by proxy" and "too hot for pre-production".

In every office, the three main types of pre-holiday behaviour are: type A – frantically get everything done before you go away; type B – frantically make a list of all the things that everyone else has to do while you’re away; type C – sod it, you’ll leave it, you’re going away soon. (NB. type Bs: whatever you put on your list, whatever you say that absolutely has to be done – no-one will do it. And, when you get back, it won’t have mattered.)

I walked past an agency crowd outside a pub recently and heard the phrase 'ice-cream by proxy'

Even hard-working columnists are inclined to wind down a little, cut back on the incisive commentary and try to get away with some hot-weather web suggestions for people who can’t be bothered with real work.

Two minutes to fill? Look up a story on the Seattle PI website called "Region leaps into summer mode as temps soar". It’s not an interesting story, but have a look at what the initial letters of every paragraph spell out. That’s a journalist working hard to express himself.

I was told once of a copywriter doing something similar to assert their authorship of a highly awarded campaign in the face of a credit-hogging creative director. If anyone knows whether this is true or acrostic apocrypha, please let me know. Especially if you have evidence.

Got slightly longer? Look up Anil Dash’s "10 rules of internet". Here are my favourites: "1. Given enough time, any object which can generate musical notes will be used to play the Super Mario Brothers theme on YouTube." "5. Any new form of electronic communication will first be dismissed as trivial and worthless until it produces a profound result, after which it will be described as obvious and boring."

Got ten minutes and want to read something about the future of film and Vine? Look for a piece on Tribecafilm.com called "Trapped in the loop" and tell me that LeBron James GIF isn’t the most interesting filmic idea you’ve seen in years. Happy summer.

Russell Davies is a creative director at Government Digital Service

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