LG aims to bounce back with 'It's All Possible' brand identity

LG Electronics has unveiled a new brand identity and strapline ,'It's All Possible', promising to highlight its "dedication to delivering differentiated values and experiences" to consumers.

LG: It's All Possible campaign goes live in New York's Times Square
LG: It's All Possible campaign goes live in New York's Times Square

The Korean technology company aims to prove to consumers that LG is conscious of how technology and consumer behaviour has evolved over the years, by putting forward its "consumer-focused" goals to inspire and empower its users, while making them smile.

A campaign launches today across TV, print, outdoor and digital platforms to position LG as a technology brand that seeks to "delight" customers with its unique, consumer-centric products.

It is understood that the brand overhaul will run alongside LG’s long-standing 'Life’s Good' corporate mantra.

LG will also launch the new G2 smartphone next week on 7 August.

Ki-wan Kim, executive vice-president and global marketing officer of LG Electronics, said: "Our new brand identity and communications campaign will encourage audiences to see LG as a force for positive change, not only a manufacturer.

"In order to create value-added solutions which bring greater convenience and enjoyment to everyday life, LG draws its inspiration from real consumers around the world. 'It’s All Possible' will serve to reinforce our strong reputation as a people-centric company that can make customers smile."

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