Most Contagious/A road map for the immediate future

Most Contagious celebrates and interrogates the key events, movements, innovations and people that shaped 2013, connecting the dots and priming attendees for the challenges and opportunities of the months ahead. It is the year in a day.

Most Contagious/A road map for the immediate future

This unique hybrid event is dedicated to dissecting the trends, technologies and creative thinking that are transforming how consumers behave and the way brands and businesses operate and communicate. It celebrates the biggest innovations, the most disruptive start-ups, the most impactful marketing, decoding the impact these will have on the immediate future for brands and advertising.

Most Contagious happens on the 11th December 2013, simultaneously in London and New York. Last year's event saw a combination of CEO's, CMO's, CCO's, CIO's, ECD's, global brand directors, directors of innovation, digital directors, strategic planners, and directors of insight come together, who between them represented over 16 countries. Brands and media owners included Adidas, ASOS, Barclays, British Airways, BSkyB, Danone, Diageo, Nike, Google, Kraft, Mariott, and P&G.

Participants should expect live debate and hands-on engagement; exhibitions of new technologies and emerging business ideas; the chance to gather with a cross-section of marketing industry experts to collectively make sense of the ways in which the world is changing.

For more information and full details of our speaker programme and lunchtime workshops please visit or email

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