Three-quarters of Scots 'oblivious' to Commonwealth Games sponsors

Nearly three-quarters of Scottish consumers are unable to identify a single sponsor of next year's Commonwealth Games in Glasgow, according to new research.

Irn-Brew: 15% of Scots know owner AG Barr is an official supporter of The Games
Irn-Brew: 15% of Scots know owner AG Barr is an official supporter of The Games

The report by YouGov reveals 73% of adults in Scotland are oblivious to the identities of the brands backing the Games.

Of the official sponsors, energy company SSE is correctly identified by 16% of Scots, with other sponsors such as Emirates (13%) and Virgin Media (7%) receiving even lower recognition levels.

To make things worse, a quarter of Scots mistakenly believe that RBS is an official sponsor, while nearly one in five (19%) believe Highlands Spring is an official supporter of the event.

Apart from drinks manufacturer AG Barr, which 15% correctly identify as an official supporter, each of the eight other official supporters have 4% or less awareness.

The results will come as a blow to brands which have spent significant sums on sponsoring the Games.

Last month, Virgin Media recruited British world champion sprinter Christine Ohuruogu to its "Team Virgin Media" group of ambassadors, which already includes Usain Bolt, Mo Farah and Paralympian Richard Whitehead.

YouGov surveyed a sample of 1,297 adults in Scotland aged 18 and over. The survey was carried out online between 24 and 27 September.

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