The great digital attention deficit

It is difficult to ignore the corrosive impact of the competing layers of technology that surround us, writes Nicola Kemp, in the latest in our Forward 50 trends series.

When for many consumers the biggest source of stress in life is a screen, it is not surprising that a swathe of the population is beginning to reassess the implications of the digital revolution. As smartphone ownership grows, it is difficult to ignore the corrosive impact of the competing layers of technology that surround us.

In their desire to record and share every moment, are consumers sacrificing their connection to the present? Has a form of attention deficit disorder taken hold, where not only platforms but people must fight for attention?

Chris Buckley, director of social engagement at "intelligent influence" agency TMW and a member of the IAB Future Trends Council believes that while members of Generation Y are used to multiscreening and engaging with lots of different platforms at the same time, they do not have an inability to concentrate on the present.

"They experience the present in a different way from previous generations," he says. "I don’t think they are missing out. Life curation is how they experience the present moment. It’s different from previous generations, but it’s not to say that it’s less meaningful."

Subscribe to Campaign from just £57 per quarter

Includes the weekly magazine and quarterly Campaign IQ, plus unrestricted online access.

SUBSCRIBE

Looking for a new job?

Get the latest creative jobs in advertising, media, marketing and digital delivered directly to your inbox each day.

Create an Alert Now
Sainsbury's moves £60m ad account to Wieden & Kennedy
Share

1 Sainsbury's moves £60m ad account to Wieden & Kennedy

Sainsbury's has moved its £60m advertising account into Wieden & Kennedy, ending its 35-year-relationship with Abbott Mead Vickers BBDO.

The top 10 brands favoured by Remainers and Brexiters
Shares0
Share

1 The top 10 brands favoured by Remainers and Brexiters

Marketers can learn about our divided nation by examining the brands that appeal across the voting referendum voting split, says Emily James, chief strategy officer at Rainey Kelly Campbell Roalfe/Y&R.

Just published