Absolut unveils 'content-rich' trends website

Absolut has revamped its website in a bid to engage fans by offering them content focused on real-time cutting-edge trends and collaborations.

Absolut: seeks to engage fans with revamped site
Absolut: seeks to engage fans with revamped site

The new mobile-optimised site will seek to "immerse fans in the world of Absolut with fresh content focusing on cocktail culture and creative executions", according to the vodka brand’s owner Pernod Ricard.

Localised versions of the site will be released in the UK and across all of the Absolut markets, where a mixture of globally relevant content and country-specific local content will work together, to maximise the impact to audiences in all countries.

The news content will come from topics which "fuel the cultural conversation" around the brand, tapping into ongoing projects made by, supported by or relevant to, Absolut.

The new site comes with a refreshed master brand identity including an updated logo, typeface and colour palette, which pulls the growing portfolio of Absolut products under one common look and feel. The new identity has been designed to simplify, unify and amplify the brand’s messaging platforms, allowing the editorial team to tell a wide range of stories.

Adam Boita, marketing controller for Pernod Ricard UK, said: "The aim of Absolut.com is to pull in the best content from different countries around the world, so the brand can present and curate our picks of trends in music, fashion, culture – while also meeting the needs of Absolut’s consumers in the UK with locally focused information and news."

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