Scarlett Johansson quits Oxfam over SodaStream Super Bowl ad

Hollywood actress Scarlett Johansson has terminated her relationship with Oxfam after being criticised about her endorsement of Israeli-based soft drinks firm SodaStream.

Scarlett Johansson: stars in SodaStream ad
Scarlett Johansson: stars in SodaStream ad

Johansson appears in a SodaStream TV ad (below) which was due to be shown during this weekend’s Super Bowl in the US, but was banned by broadcaster Fox due to the inclusion of the line "Sorry, Coke and Pepsi".

Oxfam, which has used Johansson as an ambassador since 2007, subsequently came under fire from pro-Palestinian campaigners over the fact that SodaStream has a factory in a disputed Israeli settlement in the West Bank territory.

The charity issued a statement that said it was "considering the implications" of Johansson’s new partnership with SodaStream, in line with its policy that Israeli settlements in the West Bank are "illegal".

Johansson has now opted to end her ties with the humanitarian group, citing "a fundamental difference of opinion" over the matter.

A statement read: "Scarlett Johansson has respectfully decided to end her ambassador role with Oxfam after eight years.

"She and Oxfam have a fundamental difference of opinion in regards to the boycott, divestment and sanctions movement. She is very proud of her accomplishments and fundraising efforts during her tenure with Oxfam."

SodaStream intends to broadcast the banned ad in the UK next week on Monday 3 February on Channel 4.

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