Adidas withdraws 'sexualised' World Cup T-shirts after Brazil backlash

Adidas is withdrawing a series of risqué Brazilian-themed T-shirts ahead of this summer's Fifa World Cup, after complaints that they encourage sex tourism.

Adidas: withdraws 'sexualised' World Cup T-shirts
Adidas: withdraws 'sexualised' World Cup T-shirts

The brand, an official sponsor of the World Cup in Brazil, released two T-shirts in US at a time when the Brazilian government is keen to tackle the country’s reputation as a haven for sex tourism.

One shirt featured a bikini-clad female on a Rio de Janeiro beach alongside the words "Looking to Score", while the other showed the upside buttocks of a woman wearing a thong bikini bottom in a shape of an "I love Brazil" heart.

Brazilian tourist body Embratur demanded that Adidas withdraw the items from sale and stated: "Embratur strongly repudiates the sale of products that link Brazil's image to sexual appeal."

The country’s president Dilma Rousseff also tweeted that, while Brazil is happy to receive tourists for the World Cup, it is "ready to combat sex tourism".

An Adidas spokesperson confirmed the shirts would be removed from sale: "Adidas always pays close attention to the opinion of its consumers and partners. Therefore, it is announcing that these products will not be sold any more."

The World Cup kicks off on 12 June.

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