Mr Kipling mocks 'exceedingly good' strapline axe rumours

Mr Kipling has used a press ad to deny it is axing its iconic slogan "exceedingly good cakes".

Mr Kipling uses ads to deny it is scrapping
Mr Kipling uses ads to deny it is scrapping

The Premier Foods-owned brand has taken out ads in freesheet newspaper Metro, stating: "Mr Kipling doesn’t do rumours, but he does make exceedingly good cakes."

The ads come in the wake of an article appearing in the Daily Telegraph in which Premier Foods chief executive Gavin Darby admitted it was "possible" that the strapline – devised in 1967 – may be absent from a forthcoming marketing push for Mr Kipling.

The cake brand is one of Premier Foods’ ‘Power Brands’, and is set to receive a reinjection of marketing spend after the group announced its results earlier this month.

Talking post-results, Darby told the Telegraph: "The cake category is our focus for 2014. This has been the brand that’s been the casualty of Premier having no money. It’s a £1bn category and we’ve invested almost nothing in advertising and very little in new product development.

"We’re going to have new packaging, new advertising and we’ve also announced a £20m doubling of our capacity to produce Mr Kipling snack packs, which is where we’re getting a lot of our growth."

Speaking on the subject of the "exceedingly good" strapline, Darby said: "We haven’t used it because we haven’t done any advertising in the last period. We’re on the verge of agreeing the TV commercial. That’s under wraps at this point, but this is the year of Mr Kipling."

"We’re going to have new packaging, new advertising and we’ve also announced a £20m doubling of our capacity to produce Mr Kipling snack packs, which is where we’re getting a lot of our growth."

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