WhatsApp founder denies 'careless' reports that it will open up data to Facebook

WhatsApp founder Jan Koum has spoken out against "inaccurate and careless" rumours that the messaging app may open up its data for new owner Facebook to exploit for advertising purposes.

WhatsApp: founder Jan Koum confirms it will continue to be an independent service
WhatsApp: founder Jan Koum confirms it will continue to be an independent service

In a blog post entitled "Setting the record straight", WhatsApp founder Jan Koum reiterated that the messaging app will continue to operate "independently and autonomously" of Facebook in the wake of its $19 billion (£11.4 billion) acquisition.

Drawing on his childhood in the Soviet Union, Koum said he "deeply" values the "principle of private communication" and is not willing to allow the deal with Facebook to "compromise [that] vision".

Koum wrote: "Respect for your privacy is coded into our DNA and we built WhatsApp around the goal of knowing as little about you as possible.

"You don’t have to give us your name and we don’t ask for an email address. We don’t know your birthday. We don’t know your home address. We don’t know where you work. We don’t know your likes, what you search for on the internet, or collect your GPS position.

"None of that data has ever been collected and stored by WhatsApp, and we really have no plans to change that."

He added: "If partnering with Facebook meant that we had to change our values, we wouldn’t have done it. Instead, we are forming a partnership that would allow us to continue operating independently and autonomously. Our fundamental values and beliefs will not change.

"Make no mistake: our future partnership with Facebook will not compromise the vision that brought us to this point. Our focus remains on delivering the promise of WhatsApp far and wide, so that people around the world have the freedom to speak their mind without fear."

In 2012, Facebook was forced to reassure users of its Instagram photo-sharing platform that it had no intention to sell photos for advertising purposes, following a social media backlash.

Subscribe to Campaign from just £57 per quarter

Includes the weekly magazine and quarterly Campaign IQ, plus unrestricted online access.

SUBSCRIBE

Looking for a new job?

Get the latest creative jobs in advertising, media, marketing and digital delivered directly to your inbox each day.

Create an Alert Now
Omnicom shuts M2M in UK after account losses
Share

1 Omnicom shuts M2M in UK after account losses

Omnicom has shut its media agency M2M in the UK following a string of account losses and Alistair MacCullum, the chief executive of M2M, is stepping down.

Brands that forge an emotional tie are best protected from copycats
Shares0
Share

1 Brands that forge an emotional tie are best protected from copycats

Forging an emotional tie with consumers is one of the strongest ways to protect your brand. Products can be copycatted, but the distinctive identity of a true brand can never be replicated argues Nir Wegrzyn, CEO of BrandOpus.

Just published