Post Office kicks off marketing hiring spree to boost commercial ambitions

The Post Office is recruiting a trio of senior marketers, as the business seeks to meet its ambitions of becoming a "commercially viable" multichannel retailer.

Post Office: kicks off marketing hiring spree to boost commercial ambitions
Post Office: kicks off marketing hiring spree to boost commercial ambitions

The business aims to hire a head of marketing communications, a head of brand strategy and a senior marketing manager. Each will report to chief marketing officer Pete Markey, who joined the brand from insurer RSA earlier this year.

The new head of marketing communications will lead a "large multidisciplinary team" at the firm’s offices on Old Street in London. The team will be responsible for delivering quarterly and annual marketing plans, overseeing agency appointments and relationships, and managing the Post Office’s annual £35m marketing budget.

Meanwhile, the head of brand strategy will be tasked with creating an "inspiring brand proposition" which delivered through "products and services, environment and channels, communications and storytelling, and people and culture".

The recruitment drive forms part of a wider "modernisation" project at the Post Office, with chief commercial officer Martin George – formerly of British Airways and Bupa – looking to drive additional revenues from telecoms and financial services products.

In March, George said the recruitment of Markey would help to transform the Post Office into a "multi-channel, commercially viable retailer".

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