Twitter introduces optimised campaigns

Twitter has introduced objective-based campaigns, which allow advertisers to only pay for ads that meet their campaign objectives.

Twitter: introduces optimised campaigns
Twitter: introduces optimised campaigns

Advertisers can decide whether they want people to engage with their tweets, click to go to a website and/or provide contact details, install or engage with apps or simply increase their number of followers.

Initially small and medium businesses (SMB) can use the service through the Twitter self-service ad platform but Twitter will invite "managed clients" to use the functionality in the coming months.

For example, if the campaign objective is to provide leads, advertisers will only pay when users provide their details through a Lead Generation Card embedded in the promoted tweet, or if a brand wants to promote its app, it will only pay when users click through to the app.

Much digital advertising is already based around a pay-per-click model but what Twitter is offering through optimised campaigns is an additional layer of control for the brand.

In December Google introduced its TrueView YouTube ads, where users can chose to skip ads and advertisers only pay for ads that are watched all the way through.

Twitter opened up its self-service ad platform to small to SMB in November 2013. At the same time Twitter announced an educational and training partnership with O2 to help SMB use the platform.

This article was first published on Campaignlive.co.uk

Subscribe to Campaign from just £57 per quarter

Includes the weekly magazine and quarterly Campaign IQ, plus unrestricted online access.

SUBSCRIBE

Looking for a new job?

Get the latest creative jobs in advertising, media, marketing and digital delivered directly to your inbox each day.

Create an Alert Now
The top 10 brands favoured by Remainers and Brexiters
Shares0
Share

1 The top 10 brands favoured by Remainers and Brexiters

Marketers can learn about our divided nation by examining the brands that appeal across the voting referendum voting split, says Emily James, chief strategy officer at Rainey Kelly Campbell Roalfe/Y&R.

Just published