Lewis PR revenue hits $57m for FY 2014

The independent agency attributed organic growth increases to client wins across regions, including SAS in the UK and Ireland, Nikon, Spotify, and Zumba Fitness.

Chris Lewis: CEO & founder, Lewis PR
Chris Lewis: CEO & founder, Lewis PR

Lewis PR reported revenue of $57 million on Monday morning for the fiscal year ending July 31, representing 42% growth from the year prior.

The firm also achieved 17% global organic growth during the fiscal year, including 22% organic growth in the US compared with the prior year. Organic growth in Europe was 12%, while the rate in Asia-Pacific was 25%. The UK achieved a 15% organic growth rate.

The independent agency attributed organic growth increases to client wins across regions, including SAS in the UK and Ireland, Nikon, Spotify, and Zumba Fitness.

Morgan McLintic, Lewis PR, EVP, said social media marketing and web development are areas growing quickly at the firm. In terms of technology-specific sectors, he cited security and companies preparing to go public as specialties performing well.

President and CEO Chris Lewis credited the firm’s employee-ownership model in the statement, saying, for one, it allows the agency to make investments.

He said: "For example, we will continue to invest in digital talent as [digital marketing unit] Lewis Pulse expands globally," he said. "We expect to continue our geographic expansion and sector diversification with several strategic acquisitions next year."

Lewis reported a 24.4% increase in global revenue to $44.8 million in its 2013 calendar year for PRWeek’s Agency Business Report. US revenue was up 55.8% in the US during that time to $19 million. The firm has four offices in the US.

In May, Lewis PR acquired UK-based digital marketing agency Purestone in an all-cash transaction that quadrupled the size of its London-based digital team to 25. It also launched the Lewis+ partner network earlier this year.

In June 2013, the firm also acquired the Davies Murphy Group, which had offices in the US, UK, and Germany.

This story was updated on August 11 with organic-growth information.

Subscribe to Campaign from just £57 per quarter

Includes the weekly magazine and quarterly Campaign IQ, plus unrestricted online access.

SUBSCRIBE

Looking for a new job?

Get the latest creative jobs in advertising, media, marketing and digital delivered directly to your inbox each day.

Create an Alert Now
Brands that forge an emotional tie are best protected from copycats
Shares0
Share

1 Brands that forge an emotional tie are best protected from copycats

Forging an emotional tie with consumers is one of the strongest ways to protect your brand. Products can be copycatted, but the distinctive identity of a true brand can never be replicated argues Nir Wegrzyn, CEO of BrandOpus.

Just published