Twitter extends ad offering with Promoted Video trial

Twitter has launched a beta trial of its Promoted Video ad service, which it claims offers brands an "easy" method to distribute video content and measure its effectiveness.

Twitter: launches Promoted Videos beta trial
Twitter: launches Promoted Videos beta trial

In a blog post by David Regan, senior product manager, TV and video, the social network claims that tests have shown that tweets containing "native Twitter video" generate better engagement with users.

Twitter will be allowing advertisers to run campaigns with a new cost-per-view buying model, meaning they will only be charged once a user starts playing the video.

Brands will be able to follow their campaigns using a "robust" video analytics services, offering a completion percentage and a breakdown of organic and paid video views.

Regan added that Twitter is also in discussions with content publishers and verified users over extending the video service beyond advertisers: "The overall goal is to bring more video into our users’ timelines to create a richer and more engaging Twitter.

"Video is an incredible storytelling medium and we’re thrilled to be giving brands, publishers and a subset of verified users the ability to share organic and Promoted Video on Twitter."

Last week, it was reported that Twitter may be nearing a move into ecommerce, with a number of users spotting a newly introduced but inactive setting for "Payment & Shipping" inside the social network's Android app.

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