Inadvertently rude logos

A logo is an representation of a brand and the company as a whole, although on occasion the art director does not get it quite right. Here, we bring you some of the best - or worst - examples of accidentally risqué marques. We apologies for what you are about to see.

Greggs hit the news a few weeks ago after hackers managed to alter its tagline on its logo to read "providing shit to scum for over 70 years". There may been some initial blushes but the chain reacted with a calm head and turned the situation to its advantage with an impressive social media response, using #FixGreggs.

However, while the Greggs logo was mischievously altered, other logos unintentionally reveal an x-rated side. Airbnb was on the receiving end of a deluge of sly comments on social media this summer regarding people's alternative interpretation of its new logo (see below).

In the spirit of "something for the weekend", here are 12 examples of when logos go bad.

Airbnb: below the belt for some

Greggs (after hack)

DoughBoys: its db initials were more than the sum of its parts

A-Style: perhaps not the "style" the clothing brand wanted to convey

This painful reminder to have a logo checked was brought to you by the School of Oriental Studies

Lie back and relax: this dental clinic tried to convey a sense of its caring side

A bit of monkey business

It's a mouse

OK this one is just childish

The double sausage

Swedish property management company Locum is feeling the love

And last but not least, Junior Jazz goes x-rated

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