INTEGRATED: PORTFOLIO; Paul Kitcatt

By CAROLINE MARSHALL, campaignlive.co.uk, Friday, 10 November 1995 12:00AM

There are rises, and there are meteoric rises. Paul Kitcatt, 38, joined the direct marketing agency, Brann, as a trainee copywriter in 1989. Three-and-a-half years later, Kitcatt, who was once a bookseller, and then a teacher, became an executive creative director. He was also a member of the management buyout team that purchased the agency at the beginning of last year.

There are rises, and there are meteoric rises. Paul Kitcatt, 38, joined

the direct marketing agency, Brann, as a trainee copywriter in 1989.

Three-and-a-half years later, Kitcatt, who was once a bookseller, and

then a teacher, became an executive creative director. He was also a

member of the management buyout team that purchased the agency at the

beginning of last year.



Kitcatt has worked on various financial, charity, fmcg, automotive and

leisure accounts. He now runs a 55-strong creative department, where the

pool of skills is wide enough to offer clients both loyalty and image-

enhancing work.



In order of creative billings, Brann’s clients are: Colonial Direct,

Peugeot, DHL, Guinness and the RSPCA. In terms of total agency billings,

the list reads: Zurich Municipal, Microsoft, Touch Line, Barclays and

Colonial Direct. The difference is explained by the fact that Brann

earns revenue from telemarketing, data analysis and research, as well as

creative services.



The agency’s direct mail work for the Salvation Army led to the radio

and press ads, inserts and a TV ad which Kitcatt calls ‘the mailing

brought to life’.



The TV work for the launch of Colonial Direct was part of a fully

integrated campaign to develop the company’s corporate identity, right

down to its business cards. The creative treatment used a Windows-type

computer graphic to target financially sophisticated and technologically

friendly people.



The Guinness promotion for its lager brand, Enigma, appeared both as a

mailing and an insert, and drew heavily on the Salvador Dali imagery of

the TV ad through Publicis. ‘We saw the TV storyboard about three months

before it went on air,’ Kitcatt says.


Brann works for DHL on a raft of communications issues - not press or

TV, but almost all printed media, and now interactive media too. The

disk shown here was used to replace a complex, printed tariff guide.



Kitcatt sums up the agency’s approach: ‘No one medium takes precedence

here, understanding the customer is the key.’



This article was first published on campaignlive.co.uk

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