Private view

By GERARD STAMP, campaignlive.co.uk, Friday, 13 December 1996 12:00AM

This week we have one beauty, two good-lookers and a pig. Oh, and some more of those posters. In one, Labour promises lower income tax and, in the other, the Conservative Party proclaims ‘you’re worse off under Labour’. Or could it be the other way round? Either way, Labour seems to be sticking with its powerful grabbing hands visual. (It should be careful that people don’t think it is the same poster going up each time - how about changing the background colour on each message?)

This week we have one beauty, two good-lookers and a pig. Oh, and some

more of those posters. In one, Labour promises lower income tax and, in

the other, the Conservative Party proclaims ‘you’re worse off under

Labour’. Or could it be the other way round? Either way, Labour seems to

be sticking with its powerful grabbing hands visual. (It should be

careful that people don’t think it is the same poster going up each time

- how about changing the background colour on each message?)



Meanwhile, the Tories have forsaken their ‘demon eyes’ visual for

something altogether more chilling. We’ve got five more months of this

to look forward to.



Martini has a new festive campaign that continues the ‘beautiful drink

for beautiful people’ theme. In one ad, our bitchy spokeswoman

encourages us to ‘indulge, darlings’, while recommending liposuction for

any after-effects. In another commercial, she admonishes other

advertisers for re-running old ads at Christmas. The film then cuts to

some deeply nostalgic footage of a 70s Martini ad. Here we get on to

dangerous ground - it’s always a little self-conscious for

advertisements to talk about themselves in this way. However, the

commercial prompted memories of a girl at art college we used to call

‘Martini’. Any time, any place, anywhere...



Calder’s is attempting to convince us that its cream ale is as ‘creamy

as a stout, as smooth as a bitter and as refreshing as lager’, through

the eyes of a man who thinks he’s lived three lives before as an Irish

freedom fighter, a Yorkshire miner and a Bombay curry taster. It’s very

nicely filmed, with a thoroughly convincing ‘taste and smile’ shot (see,

they can be made to look good), after which our hero says to his pint:

‘Where have you been all my lives?’ It’s light, refreshing, but a bit

low in strength.



I’m writing this over the weekend, looking out over a bleak, brown,

muddy autumnal landscape not far from Colman’s of Norwich but a million

miles away from what is meant to pass for Norfolk in its latest

commercial. A Brummie pig leans over a dry stone wall (you don’t get any

dry stone walls in Norfolk). Beside him is a tiled barn (it should be

pantiled or thatched). Behind him in the distance is a church spire

(there are just two church spires in Norfolk) set in rolling hills (you

don’t get...). I’m not sure how many Brummie pigs there are either but,

all pedantry aside, this is a competent re-run of an old idea - one type

of animal encouraging us to eat another type of animal. There is even a

version of the idea in this year’s D&AD annual, on page 56.



Finally, a set of commercials for the Elida Faberge fragrance,

Addiction. At last, here is a perfume ad that doesn’t assault the senses

with enigmatic, pretentious cliches, usually French. All six executions

feature messages faxed between two lovers, simply known as W and R.

(Looking at the credits for these ads, I wonder if there is room for a

menage a trois, featuring the mysterious ‘M’?) Commercial breaks towards

Christmas will be peppered with unbranded ten-second spots, ending with

a pack-shot and the line: ‘Do you want a non-stop fax life?’ Excellent

music holds the whole piece together. It’s a great idea that cost

pennies to make. That’s the ‘best commercial made for under pounds

40,000’ category taken care of. By the way Rosie, my fax number is 0171-

591 9289.



Gerard Stamp is the executive creative director of Leo Burnett



Conservative Party



Project: Conservative Party

Client: Charles Lewington, director of communications

Brief: Remind voters that the Conservatives have delivered economic

success

Agency: M&C Saatchi

Writer: A. Hunn

Art director: G. Khan

Exposure: National posters



Carlsberg-Tetley



Project: Calder’s Cream Ale

Client: Doug Scott, marketing director

Brief: Launch the brand

Agency: Saatchi and Saatchi

Writer: Kes Gray

Art director: Dennis Willison

Director: Jonas Grimas

Production company: Phoenix Films

Exposure: Regional TV



Elida Faberge



Project: Addiction

Client: Simon Clift, brand development director

Brief: Establish a strong and appealing personality for Addiction

Agency: Bartle Bogle Hegarty

Writer: Will Awdry

Art directors: Rosie Arnold, Martin Galton

Directors: Rosie Arnold, Will Awdry

Production company: Bartle Bogle Hegarty

Exposure: National TV



Labour Party



Project: Budget poster

Client: Margaret McDonagh, general election co-ordinator

Brief: Highlight Tory tax rises since 1992

Agency: BMP DDB

Writer: Andy McLeod

Art directors: Richard Flintham, Peter Gatley

Photographer: Malcolm Venville

Typographer: David Wakefield

Exposure: National 48-sheet posters



Westbay Distributors



Project: Martini

Client: Chris Meredith, marketing controller

Brief: Keep Martini front of mind in the Christmas drinks market

Agency: Howell Henry Chaldecott Lury

Copywriter: Antonia Green

Art director: Nani Kohler

Director: Kim Knott

Production company: Eclipse

Exposure: National TV



Van den Bergh Foods



Project: Colman’s Classic Condiments

Client: William Brown, marketing manager

Brief: Launch Colman’s Classic Condiments as an essential element to any

roast meal

Agency: J. Walter Thompson

Writer: Richard Spencer

Art director: Jo Dickerson

Director: Matt Forrest

Production company: Tony Kaye Films

Exposure: National and satellite TV



This article was first published on campaignlive.co.uk

X

You must log in to use Clip & Save

Before commenting please read our rules for commenting on articles.

If you see a comment you find offensive, you can flag it as inappropriate. In the top right-hand corner of an individual comment, you will see 'flag as inappropriate'. Clicking this prompts us to review the comment. For further information see our rules for commenting on articles.

comments powered by Disqus

Additional Information

Campaign Jobs