Sony hits back at Apple iTunes with music download site

LONDON - Sony is to take on the dominance of Apple's iTunes by setting up a global music download service under its PlayStation brand.

The service, which is being developed by Sony Computer Entertainment Europe, will enable music to be downloaded direct to the PlayStation Portable, Sony's first entry into the handheld gaming market, which launches in the UK in March.

Marketing has learned that the download platform will initially be used as a marketing tool to offer PSP users free additional game levels and upgrades.

However, it is also being developed as a download vehicle for other potential Sony products, with a paid-for music service set to launch in the UK this summer.

Game downloads for the PSP will be free and will feature as a critical selling point in advertising. A micro-payment system is in development for the music download service.

At the end of last week Sony was forced to warn investors that profits had slumped following intense competition. The electronics giant is now pinning its revival on establishing PSP as a rival to Apple's iTunes and iPod.

If you have an opinion on this or any other issue raised on Brand Republic, join the debate in the Forum here.

Subscribe to Campaign from just £57 per quarter

Includes the weekly magazine and quarterly Campaign IQ, plus unrestricted online access.

SUBSCRIBE

Looking for a new job?

Get the latest creative jobs in advertising, media, marketing and digital delivered directly to your inbox each day.

Create an Alert Now
Sainsbury's moves £60m ad account to Wieden & Kennedy
Share

1 Sainsbury's moves £60m ad account to Wieden & Kennedy

Sainsbury's has moved its £60m advertising account into Wieden & Kennedy, ending its 35-year-relationship with Abbott Mead Vickers BBDO.

The top 10 brands favoured by Remainers and Brexiters
Shares0
Share

1 The top 10 brands favoured by Remainers and Brexiters

Marketers can learn about our divided nation by examining the brands that appeal across the voting referendum voting split, says Emily James, chief strategy officer at Rainey Kelly Campbell Roalfe/Y&R.

Just published