NEWS: RSPCA targets neglectful pet owners

campaignlive.co.uk, Friday, 26 April 1996 12:00AM

The RSPCA is extending its tradition of dramatic and harrowing advertising into an assault against people who mistreat their pets through neglect.

The RSPCA is extending its tradition of dramatic and harrowing

advertising into an assault against people who mistreat their pets

through neglect.



Abbott Mead Vickers BBDO has produced a trio of national press ads to

mark RSPCA Week, during which the charity will focus on cases of

neglect, which make up 75 per cent of all convictions for cruelty to

animals.



The press ads are part of a three-pronged campaign that also includes

cinema and radio ads with the same theme: ‘Neglect is cruelty.’



Written by Mary Wear and art directed by Damon Collins, one of the ads

features Snowy, an abandoned miniature poodle who became one of the

stars of last year’s BBC TV series, Animal Hospital.



Another ad tells the distressing story of a dog narrowly saved from

death. The headline reads: ‘How a dog starves to death. Please don’t

read this on a full stomach.’



The third attempts to dispel the belief that only poor people neglect

their animals by citing the case of a Rolls-Royce-driving property

developer who owned a disease-ridden Great Dane. A picture of the dog

carries the caption: ‘When we rescued him we found something even more

disturbing. A fat cat.’



The national press offensive is being backed with a cinema film and

radio commercials that sustain the theme by listing the disgusting

things pets will try to eat while dying from hunger.



RSPCA figures show cases of neglect rose from 1,541 in 1994 to 1,648 in

1995, despite its campaign to promote responsible pet ownership and to

discourage impulse buying.



This article was first published on campaignlive.co.uk

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