PRIVATE VIEW

By ROONEY CARRUTHERS, campaignlive.co.uk, Friday, 28 November 1997 12:00AM

Some people find it a doddle. Alan Tilby was a master at it; Terry Lovelock, the guru. It’s a full stop; a call to action; the summation of the visual treat you’ve just seen. For some clients, it’s the be all and end all ... and Larry and I hate doing it. The endline.

Some people find it a doddle. Alan Tilby was a master at it; Terry

Lovelock, the guru. It’s a full stop; a call to action; the summation of

the visual treat you’ve just seen. For some clients, it’s the be all and

end all ... and Larry and I hate doing it. The endline.



Indigenous to our industry, we created these little gems that get

housewives filling their shopping baskets, men buying expensive cars,

and leave creatives in despair. So, let’s have a look at this week’s

line-up and their endlines.



The Jeep Clothing ads are very distinctive. They pay homage to their

brand ads for the off-road vehicle by using a blue tint over a

black-and-white photo. All four feature rugged and off-road animals and

use humorous headlines such as ’like the boots’ (see mountain goat).

Meaning that, I suppose, if you wear Jeep boots, they’re rugged and

off-road enough to get you face-to-face with one of nature’s horniest

creatures - only kidding (ouch!). The endline reads: ’Off Road Clothing

For Men and Women.’ Well it’s definitely a summation, and a good one at

that.



The ads deliver what I expect from Jeep Clothing. Rugged outdoor

adventure.



Would I wear clothing associated with a car? Well, the only person I

know who wears motoring clothing is Alan Partridge. Ah Ha.



The endline for Lemsip Max Strength is: ’Hard Work Medicine.’ Not great,

but it kind of fits in perfectly with what the agency/client’s strategy

must have been for this campaign. The commercial features a chap in an

office who’s getting a bollocking from his boss who suspects him of

playing hooky (or should that be golf?) having had a day off sick with

flu. He can’t have really been ill because he managed to write that

presentation so brilliantly and he doesn’t look ill. Our chap coolly

plonks the answer on his boss’s desk - a packet of Lemsip Max

Strength.



It’s well shot, with good acting. It’s no frills, no spills

advertising.



But I would’ve liked to have seen the scripts that didn’t get made.

Achoo!



Next on the menu, a TV campaign for Batchelors Super Noodles. It’s a bit

like Men Behaving Badly but shot more trendily. These ads are quite

funny. Two of them made me laugh a little, one I didn’t understand but

the real fun comes when you listen to all the endlines: 1. ’Batchelors

super, super Super Noodles’, 2. ’Batchelors Super Noodles, because

noodles can be fun, can’t they?’, 3. ’Batchelors Super Noodles, are they

really super?’, 4. ’Batchelors. Ordinary noodles? Oh, no, my

friend.’



Well, my friend, ordinary ads they are not.



Super? Not quite. Fun? Really super. Super.



In the film for the IFAW, you have to transport yourself into the body

of a fox and see everything from the fox’s point of view. You’re making

your way home when you suddenly realise you are being hunted. Your heart

starts to pound, and you hear dogs and huntsmen in the distance. You

finally make it to the safety of your den when suddenly, and this is

where it gets good, there’s a gunshot followed by some punchy and quite

gruesome stills of brutalised, dead foxes. The endline, ’For pity’s

sake, ban fox hunting. Your MP has the power’, is powerful and the

commercial, with the help of the gunshot, takes you from a feeling of

calm and well-being to an explosion of violence.



The IFAW (press) attempts the same, but not nearly as powerfully as the

moving image.



Finally, Maverick. It’s a chocolate biscuit bar with caramel and chunky

bits. This TV spot is based around an American who, quite literally,

used to eat cars for a living and there’s even 8mm footage of our hero

eating bits of a pick-up truck to prove it. But now he’s stopped. Why?

Because he’s discovered the delicious taste of the Maverick bar. It’s

shot well and looks authentic, but how true it is, well, I just don’t

know. Maybe the endline will convince me: ’Maverick. Fills you up like a

Dodge. Tastes as good as a ’66 Mustang.’ Thank you.



Reckitt & Colman

Project: Lemsip Max Strength

Client: Kate Price, brand manager

Brief: Improve perceived efficacy

Agency: BDDP GGT

Writer: Jon Leney

Art director: Richard Donovan

Director: Paul Gay

Production company: Outsider

Exposure: National TV

The Big Yellow Company

Project: Jeep Clothing

Client: Ben Lewis, controller

Brief: Create a distinctive and aspirational clothing brand

Agency: Delaney

Fletcher Bozell Writer: David Adamson

Art director: Dick Prentice

Photographer: Stock Typographer: Dick Prentice

Exposure: Magazines, posters

Nestle

Project: Maverick

Client: Paul Sigsworth, head of innovations

Brief: Position Maverick as an interesting eat Agency: J. Walter

Thompson

Writer: Simon Brooks

Art director: Blaise Douglas

Director: Dominic Murphy Production company: Blink Productions

Exposure: National TV

IFAW (press)

Project: Ban hunting with dogs

Client: Mike Epsley

Brief: Turn the public’s passive dislike of hunting into action

Agency: Euro RSCG Wnek Gosper

Writers: Mark Wnek, Dominic Gettins, Matt Bartley

Art directors: Nigel Rose, Olly Caporn

Photography: Shots from the League Against Cruel Sports

Typographer: Lynne McIntosh

Exposure: National press

IFAW (cinema)

Project: Ban hunting with dogs

Client: Mike Epsley

Brief: as above Agency: as above Writer: Mark Wnek

Art director: Nigel Rose

Director: Anthony Easton

Production company:

Stark Films

Exposure: National cinema

Van den Bergh Foods

Project: Batchelors

Super Noodles

Client: Paula Quazi, marketing manager

Brief: Position Super Noodles as perfect nosh for adults

Agency: Mother

Writers: Mark Waits, Robert Saville

Art director: Libby Brockhoff

Director: Danny Kleinman Production co: Limelight

Exposure: National TV



This article was first published on campaignlive.co.uk

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