INTERACTIVE: THE INTERACTIVE QUESTIONNAIRE/in association with electronic telegraph

By MAIRI CLARK, campaignlive.co.uk, Friday, 29 November 1996 12:00AM

There’s no lack of off-line publications dedicated to the Internet but which one is the best?

There’s no lack of off-line publications dedicated to the Internet but

which one is the best?



Which off-line publication about online issues do you find the

most useful?



Taking a look through the AKQA library, I discovered that there’s no

definitive one-stop-shop publication that I’m into for keeping up with

new media.



Lots of publications spring up and then vanish without a trace. And the

ones that do survive tend to take an interesting angle and provide facts

and figures, which is useful.



However, here’s a selection of the ones I reckon are among the best and

we’re most loyal to: Wired US, Wired UK, Red Herring, the Economist, New

Media Age, Byte.



Ajaz Ahmed

AKQA

ajaz@akqa.com



Although not widely available in the UK, we find WebWeek is the most

informative - consistently providing intelligent comment on all aspects

of online activity. Its editorial contains comprehensive coverage of Web

developments. It has a unique commercial perspective, providing an

insight into online business strategy, drawn from involvement with

individuals manning the progress.



Wired is also a useful title. While not a dedicated Internet magazine,

it offers a broad take on the people and processes shaping our

information society - best read without a hangover...



John Hunt

Syzygy

jhunt@syzygy.co.uk



In terms of media projects launched, Creative Technology provides a very

good round-up and I read New Media Age for global issues and Campaign

for client news.



Having said all that, it’s rare that I get the opportunity to see

interesting new work - the list of good new-media companies can be

written on the toenail of a stoat.



I don’t read the Internet glossies, as they seem to be aimed at those

who don’t use the Web yet, and Wired (the US edition) can be so far up

its own arse it deserves the lambasting it gets.



I guess I read the Independent for stories like the 25th anniversary of

the microchip, but really I rely on the Internet itself for information

that will affect my business.



Felix Velarde

Hyperinteractive

felix@hyperinter

active.co.uk



I’m a long standing reader of Byte - one of the only computer magazines

that’s older than I am. It’s always authoritative and often ahead of all

the other magazines since its main articles tend to be about original

concepts and new possibilities rather than products that have just been

released.



Over the past couple of years it has become much more Net focused but

there’s still good coverage of general computing issues. It’s more

techie than Wired but not as trendy - like me really.



Robert Hamilton

Indexfinger

robert @indexfinger. com



believe everyone in advertising should be a magazine hoarder. I buy

around 25 magazines a week - everything from Digital to Caravan Weekly.

They are the bread and butter of the job, in the same way watching Blind

Date is. But a magazine for the Internet is an odd one; it seems to

reveal that no media can entirely replace another.



In fact, if you read enough Internet magazines or go to enough Net

conferences, you don’t ever need to go on the Internet to sound dead

knowledgeable; Wired or.net tell you all there is to know. Or, at least

did - when Wired looked cool, but now the graphics are tired and its in

bred UK cousin is a stupid idea that defeats the purpose of the Net

being a global medium.



Apart from obvious sensible selections such as Cyberia’s magazine, I

find magazines like ID and G-spot give the most interesting Net info. If

I hadn’t read ID, I wouldn’t know about ‘roadkills R us’, which offers

road-killed animals for sale with recipes.



Alun Howell

Ogilvy and Mather

alun@ogilvy63.net



This article was first published on campaignlive.co.uk

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