MEDIA ANALYSIS: BRAND SPEND ANALYSIS - Eco-friendly Yves Rocher understands the beauty of the press and direct mail

By COLIN GRIMSHAW, campaignlive.co.uk, Monday, 13 December 1999 12:00AM

Since the Yves Rocher Corporation founded the first botanical garden and laboratory in France in 1958, the company has positioned its brand as one that is ecologically friendly. Of course, this now fits snugly with the trend for ethically sound products.

Since the Yves Rocher Corporation founded the first botanical

garden and laboratory in France in 1958, the company has positioned its

brand as one that is ecologically friendly. Of course, this now fits

snugly with the trend for ethically sound products.



In 1965, Yves Rocher published a Green Book of Beauty, which became the

world’s most widely used catalogue of natural beauty products. In 1987,

it was the first European cosmetics company to stop testing its products

on animals. By 1995 Yves Rocher was the largest natural beauty-care

company in the world, selling its products to 25 million women in 84

countries.



This environmentally and ethically sound brand positioning is carefully

reinforced across all Yves Rocher’s advertising. This emphasises that

the natural, plant-based products have not been tested on animals and

also promotes low introductory prices.



Core advertising propositions include ’Look great, naturally’ and ’Your

beauty, comfort and total well-being are our passion.’ These sit

alongside promotional price themes such as ’Introductory prices on more

than 100 of our most popular products’ and ’Try 28 products from only

pounds 1.50. Save over 50 per cent.’



Yves Rocher does not sell its products through retailers, but instead

goes through 1,350 beauty institutes worldwide and has also embraced the

internet.



Planning and buying in the UK are executed by Simon Whitworth, director

of David Coleman Media. The company has held the Yves Rocher account for

15 years and fights hard for keen, last-minute deals. Whitworth says:

’Yves Rocher was green before green was fashionable.’



Its UK adspend for January to October 1999 was almost pounds 3.5

million, split between direct mail and press advertising which account

for 87 per cent and 13 per cent of adspend respectively. There was also

a small amount of radio advertising but the total radio spend amounted

to less than pounds 5,000.



Most of Yves Rocher’s advertising this year has been concentrated in

September and January- these two months accounting for more than 40 per

cent of spend.



The sum spent on press advertising amounted to pounds 437,904. It was

placed exclusively in consumer magazines, mainly women’s titles. The

Daily Mail’s You magazine got more than pounds 80,000, while What’s on

TV and Family Circle both landed more than pounds 40,000. The Lady and

Top Sante also fared well.



The other titles were Cable Guide, Debenhams magazine, Essentials,

Health & Fitness, Marie Claire, Prima, Radio Times, Shape, She, Weight

Watchers, Slimming and TV Quick.



Almost 75 per cent of the company’s direct mail is aimed at existing

clients, and these fall mainly in the 35-44 and 65+ age groups.



Yves Rocher is a relatively sophisticated direct mailer, issuing

different executions to niche target groups (MMS tracked more than ten

different mailings in October, for example). It shows clear evidence of

good database usage, which enables seasonal campaigns (such as its

Christmas Beauty Catalogue and a Halloween Special) and customer loyalty

activity such as birthday mailings and the sending of gift vouchers to

loyal customers.





Research by Media Monitoring Services, tel: 01344-627553

www.mediamonitoring.com.



This article was first published on campaignlive.co.uk

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