MEDIA: WEDDING DAY - AN EXPERT’S VIEW. Eve Pollard’s bridal bible offers a fresh perspective, Stephanie Andrews writes

By STEPHANIE ANDREWS, the PR manager at M&, campaignlive.co.uk, Friday, 19 November 1999 12:00AM

The man I love has proposed to me and I’m now faced with one of the toughest decisions of my life ... whether to read a bridal magazine and, if so, which one? Accepting his proposal was easy but, to be honest, I’ve always had an aversion to this genre of magazine - my perception being that they seek to reinforce a stereotype of what is ultimately a personal and therefore unique day.

The man I love has proposed to me and I’m now faced with one of the

toughest decisions of my life ... whether to read a bridal magazine and,

if so, which one? Accepting his proposal was easy but, to be honest,

I’ve always had an aversion to this genre of magazine - my perception

being that they seek to reinforce a stereotype of what is ultimately a

personal and therefore unique day.



However, anyone organising their wedding needs guidance and

inspiration.



After all, your wedding day will be one of the most important events in

your life and I think it’s true to say most brides want it to

encapsulate a dream of romantic perfection which has been with them for

some time.



Given the scepticism with which I greeted the offer to review the first

issue of Wedding Day, I was pleasantly surprised. The ’stylish, modern

guide for brides’, launched by Eve Pollard and Linda Kelsey, seems to

achieve its aim.



Tacky bridalwear ads don’t dominate the pages and the voyeuristic ’Real

Wedding’ section included tastefully spontaneous photos and amusing,

anecdotal editorial.



The beauty advice throughout is practical and unpretentious, while

statistics in Wedding Day’s survey include interesting facts such as ’8

per cent of newlyweds are unfaithful in the first five years’ and ’25

per cent of newlyweds don’t make love on their wedding night’.



The modern bride is given essential internet surfing advice in ’Wedded

to the web’, although the quality of the photographs in Wedding Day

could never be reproduced on a computer screen. I found myself drooling

over the Conde Nast Traveller-style ’Honeymoon Heaven’ section.


The modern groom, however, does get neglected. Given the rise in

popularity of the male fashion magazine, perhaps future issues will

redress this.



Anyone who has recently become engaged would testify to the fact that

cynicism about marriage has waned and romance is alive and well.



The magazine does a good job of showcasing the fun you can have

organising the big day, but it is more likely that I’ll keep my vows on

the day than buy a subscription.





Publisher: Parkhill Publishing



Editor: Linda Kelsey



Cover price: pounds 3.00



Frequency: Bi-monthly



Initial print run: 80,000



Ad rate full-page colour: pounds 5,950



Advertisers include Calvin Klein, Denby, Harrods, The Couture Company,

Estee Lauder.



This article was first published on campaignlive.co.uk

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