Farr poised to quit BBC after Dyke shake-up

campaignlive.co.uk, Wednesday, 05 April 2000 12:00AM

- Sue Farr is poised to quit the BBC after Greg Dyke's streamlining of the Corporation's management structure left her without a senior executive role.

- Sue Farr is poised to quit the BBC after Greg Dyke's streamlining of the Corporation's management structure left her without a senior executive role.

Farr , who last year was appointed director of public service marketing at the BBC and has helped to significantly build the presence of marketing within the corporation, had been expected to retain the top marketing job after the reshuffle. But Dyke instead appointed Matthew Bannister, the former chief executive of BBC Production and, to the role of director for marketing and communications.

Farr said: "This consolidation is something that I have been championing throughout my seven year career at the BBC. At the same time, I now need to consider my own position. The BBC has asked me to stay and I am currently considering that." It is thought that she will make a decision within the next couple of weeks.

Bannister, who has no marketing experience, will be one of 17 directors to sit on a new executive committee, created by Dyke to bring him closer to the key editorial and programming decision-making. He has said he is keen for both Farr and Jane Frost, controller of corporate marketing, to stay.

Frost said: "Provided that there is a meaningful role that Matthew wants and that I would like, I will stay at the BBC. I will be helping him with the restructuring."

The restructure sees Mark Thompson promoted to director of television while Alan Yentob, the former director of television, has been put in charge of BBC drama, entertainment and children. Yentob will also handle the creation of a new film unit, along the lines of Channel 4's Film Four.

Dyke expects the staff cutbacks and sleeker BBC structure to yield an additional £200 million a year, which will help meet the savings target of £1.2 billion set by the Government over the next seven years.

Dyke said: "Cutting duplication across the BBC should make us more agile and more flexible, giving us more money to put into the heart of the BBC - the programmes."



This article was first published on campaignlive.co.uk

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