New Moon achieves Olympic success with winning film

LONDON - New Moon, the production company responsible for the 'Make Britain Proud -- London 2012' film and 'Inspiration', is being hailed as playing a vital role in London winning the bid to host the 2012 Olympics Games.

The films, produced and directed by Daryl Goodrick and Caroline Rowland of London-based New Moon, competed against those by Steven Spielberg, director of the New York film, and Luc Besson, who directed the Paris film.

Mayor Ken Livingstone said the film's powerful message "won us the Olympics" after the decision that was announced at the final selection process at the IOC presentation in Singapore yesterday at 12.46pm London time.

The three-minute 'Inspiration' film featured children from around the world who were so motivated by the idea of 2012 London Games that they were inspired to grow up to be world-class athletes themselves.

The 'Make Britain Proud -- London 2012' film, which scooped 13 awards at the International Visual Communication Awards, stars many sporting and non-sporting celebrities such as David Beckham, Jeremy Irons, Matthew Pinsent and Kelly Holmes.

Caroline Rowland, managing director of New Moon, said: "Words can barely sum up how proud I feel at this moment. It has been an honour and a privilege to have contributed to the campaign's success and I look forward to seeing the games in London."

Rowland and Goodrich have recently produced commercials for Travelex starring Jonny Wilkinson, British Airways, Ford, Sony and Velux Windows.

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