The Annual 2006: Top 10 photographers

campaignlive.co.uk, Friday, 15 December 2006 12:00AM

1. NADAV KANDER

With a huge catalogue of work and a reputation that's still growing, it's hard to argue against Kander being number one. The Israeli-born snapper has won fans by pushing the boundaries of ad photography, while nailing every brief. One side-effect of being such a talent is a reputation for being high-maintenance, but the creative directors recognise it's a small price to pay for perfection.

2. NICK KNIGHT

Running Kander a close second, Knight is also considered a master of his trade, in adland and the wider media world. Having worked for the likes of Vogue and Dazed & Confused, shown his work in galleries and turned his hand to film and interactive projects, it's difficult to label him. But what seems to turn creative directors on is Knight's skill with imagery and effects.

3. NICK MEEK

Big on atmosphere and creating a unique feel to his work, Meek has attracted industry awards like a magnet over the past few years for clients such as PlayStation and Volkswagen. His ability to infuse a sense of the where and when into his work boosts his credentials in agency circles, as it all helps tell the story quickly and make a bigger impact.

4. NICK GEORGHIOU

The man behind the iconic shot of Wayne Rooney that won the day at this year's Campaign Poster Awards, Georghiou is famed for his passion, and that the ad work in his portfolio is as strong as his private projects. With clients from Mercedes to NSPCC, Georghiou has achieved wide popularity. Creative and respected for the striking quality of his images, 2006 has been another success.

5. SUE PARKHILL

In an industry full of huge egos, Parkhill is easy to work with, and approachable. She is also regarded in adland's creative circles as a great problem-solver with enormous technical nous. Consistently knocking out good work (clients this year include Yell) while cramming trips to Eastern Europe in along the way for private projects, Parkhill's work is contemporary and her documentary style popular.

6. CHRIS FRAZER SMITH

Frazer Smith has won acclaim not just for his great images, but also for a deep understanding of the other elements that go into a great ad. He has worked all over the world, but mops up plenty of work from London. A creative director's dream, thanks to his reputation for looking at the bigger picture.

7. GUIDO MOCAFICO

If you've got a brief that requires creative inspiration, Mocafico has shown he's more than up to the job. With plenty of editorial work behind him, Mocafico has sparkle and has more than delivered the goods for luxury brands such as Bulgari. Attention to detail and flair have kept him in the front of many minds.

8. BEN STOCKLEY

A bit of a deviant from "classic" ad images, Stockley is nonetheless a man in demand. In no small part thanks to his work for Nike last year - lots of streaks of light rushing through beautifully shot urban settings - and some pretty ace pics for Stella Artois the year before. Still in his early thirties, Stockley could find himself climbing the ladder if he keeps coming up with work of this quality.

9. PAOLO ROVERSI

Top dog when it comes to fashion ad photography, Roversi started out in Italy before moving to Paris. At 59, he has been round the block a few times, directing a few ads along the way too for the likes of Chanel, Evian and Kenzo. His body of photographic work is as large as it is impressive and his reputation in fashion circles remains great.

10. MERT & MARCUS

This pair came out of nowhere a couple of years back, winning lots of admirers in the fashion and ad worlds with their camp and sometimes surreal images. Ad work has included clients from Louis Vuitton to Hugo Boss, while editorial projects for Vogue don't do their profile much harm either. Nor does working with Jennifer Lopez and Madonna!

These days, the duo can be found working away in a rather more dashing abode, up on a hill in the posh part of Ibiza.

This article was first published on campaignlive.co.uk

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