Advertising & Promotion: Coke in pounds 17m prize draw.

Coca-Cola is launching its biggest ever consumer promotion, worth pounds 17m, which will see it clash head-to-head with Pepsi’s Spice Girls music promotion.

Coca-Cola is launching its biggest ever consumer promotion, worth

pounds 17m, which will see it clash head-to-head with Pepsi’s Spice

Girls music promotion.



The Coke promotion uses the line ’Thirst for it’, which will appear on

packs of Coke and Diet Coke, and will be supported by a pounds 4m TV

campaign.



It will give consumers the chance to win one of 30 prizes over 30 days,

starting on July 14. There will also be three million instant prizes of

drinks and merchandise.



The three 40-second ads, created by Publicis, star Men Behaving Badly

actor Neil Morrissy and will be accompanied by a leaflet drop to five

million households.



Although the promotion is UK-specific, the top prizes make use of Coke’s

global sponsorships and include a trip to Brazil to see the country’s

football team play, a Christmas visit to New Zealand and a trip to the

Olympic Games in Australia.



Three numbers will be printed on ring pulls or bottle tops and, on each

day of the promotion, a winning number will be announced on Channel 4’s

The Big Breakfast, Teletext, Atlantic 252’s breakfast show and in the

press. The first person to call the hotline with the matched number wins

the prize allocated for that day.



This promotion tops the pounds 14m spend Coke allocated to its Euro ’96

promotion.



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