Campaign Annual 2007: Top 10 Facebookers

campaignlive.co.uk, Friday, 14 December 2007 12:00AM

1. Rory Sutherland

All hail the undisputed king of Facebook. With more than 500 friends and counting, the Ogilvy vice-chairman is touting himself around the site like it was the red-light district of the digital world. With more applications than Mark Zuckerberg, Sutherland's pimped-up homepage tells us that he likes music by "anyone who's subsequently died in a plane crash", he has a passion for "Bosnian tartan" (chequered laundry bags) and an obsession with his Mercedes camper van, documented in a photo album entitled "Motorcaravan porn" - don't ask.

2. Nicola Mendelsohn

Facebook is to Mendelsohn what a needle is to a junkie, the ideal tool to feed her addiction. The networking fiend has, at the time of print, a haul of 264 friends, including David Miliband, Richard Exon and Jamie Oliver. But collecting "friends" isn't enough for the Grey deputy chairman. She likes to categorise them too, with 228 of them making her "top friends list". Our sympathy goes out to the 36 who didn't make the cut.

3. Tess Alps

This self-described "ex-Catholic atheist with a penchant for singing evensong" has her passion for television writ large over her Facebook profile. She's a member of several TV-themed groups, including "If you don't like Peep Show you're probably not worth knowing", "We love Green Wing" and "I love Newsnight".

4. Mark Wnek

Wnek is relatively new to the Facebook craze, but has managed to accumulate more than 150 friends in just over a month. As well as having a friends list that reads like a who's who in media and advertising, the Lowe New York man has become a frenetic status updater. But with entries such as "Mark is sunbathing", "Mark is considering botox" and "Mark is looking his age", his friends may be getting the impression that he's a tad obsessed with his appearance.

5. Damon Collins

Ecuador, Iceland, Zimbabwe: just three of the exotic destinations that the Mother creative director has listed on the "countries I've visited" application. The intrepid explorer not only likes to boast about how well-travelled he is, but he's also gagging for a bit of cyber-affection, using the "kiss me" and "superpoke" applications to get his fill.

6. Mark Cridge

With 233 friends, including the geeks' favourite philosopher Alain de Botton, Cridge has thoroughly submerged himself in the digital phenomenon that is "The Book". The glue founder uses his profile in the same way teenagers use their pencil cases - documenting the achingly cool, chin-stroking indie bands that dominate his iPod.

7. David Muir

The chief executive of WPP's The Channel has certainly been channelling a lot of time and effort into his Facebook page. Unperturbed by potential security breach issues, Muir keeps his 238 friends (including numerous London Business School buddies, of course) informed of his mobile phone number, extensive CV, political leanings and exact location. A recent status update placed him "at the airport sat next to Lorraine Kelly feeling faint at the glamour of it all".

8. Russell Davies

The uber-connected blogger extraordinaire has kept his Facebook slate rather clean; instead, he uses it to keep his 338 friends in the loop on his legion of other websites and blogs, as well as to add links to his scrupulously updated Twitter feed.

9. Richard Morris

Morris, the digital horticulturist, has gone all green-fingered on his Facebook profile, adding a fulsome garden as well as a pot plant and an aquarium. The DDB European regional director also reveals his passion for movies (especially The Big Lebowski and Back to the Future) with the movie quiz application.

10. Tom Vick

One of the more selective friend-gatherers, the Freud Communications director only has 112 friends, but he likes to let them know about his educated taste in books, music and magazines. His favourites include Kraftwerk albums, Gunter Grass novels and the wine lover's favourite, Decanter magazine.

This article was first published on campaignlive.co.uk

X

You must log in to use Clip & Save

Before commenting please read our rules for commenting on articles.

If you see a comment you find offensive, you can flag it as inappropriate. In the top right-hand corner of an individual comment, you will see 'flag as inappropriate'. Clicking this prompts us to review the comment. For further information see our rules for commenting on articles.

comments powered by Disqus

Additional Information

Campaign Jobs