Kellogg's to laser-brand individual Corn Flakes in fight against fakes

LONDON - Kellogg's is to start branding individual Corn Flakes with the company logo in a bid to protect against imitation products.

The food giant plans to burn the Kellogg's signature on to individual flakes using a laser and will then insert a proportion of these branded flakes into each box.

If the system proves successful, it could be used on Kellogg's other cereal products, including Frosties, Special K and Crunchy Nut.

Helen Lyons, lead food technologist at the company, said: ''In recent years there has been an increase in the number of own brands trying to capitalise on the popularity of Kellogg's Corn Flakes.

''We want shoppers to be under absolutely no illusion that Kellogg's does not make cereal for anyone else.

''We're constantly looking at new ways to reaffirm this and giving our golden flakes of corn an official stamp of approval could be the answer."

Separately hair-appliance brand GHD has launched an anti-counterfeit ad campaign this week across print, online and social media channels.

The campaign shows that consumers can easily be led into buying fakes, which are practically impossible to spot just by looking.

GHD is encouraging consumers to search for approved stockists via the official website www.ghdhair.com/fake.

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