Ad men who manspread

A Twitter user accused outgoing Saatchi & Saatchi chairman Kevin Roberts of "manspreading". He's not the first in adland to adopt the pose.

  • Kevin Roberts, outgoing Saatchi & Saatchi chairman

    Kevin Roberts, outgoing Saatchi & Saatchi chairman

  • Andrew Robertson, president and chief executive of BBDO

    Andrew Robertson, president and chief executive of BBDO

  • Andy Nairn, founding partner of Lucky Generals

    Andy Nairn, founding partner of Lucky Generals

  • BMB founders Trevor Beattie, Andrew McGuinness and Bil Bungay

    BMB founders Trevor Beattie, Andrew McGuinness and Bil Bungay

  • Dave Buonaguidi, chief creative officer of Crispin Porter & Bogusky London

    Dave Buonaguidi, chief creative officer of Crispin Porter & Bogusky London

  • James Murphy, chief executive of Adam & Eve/DDB

    James Murphy, chief executive of Adam & Eve/DDB

  • John Hegarty, founder of Bartle Bogle Hegarty

    John Hegarty, founder of Bartle Bogle Hegarty

  • Martin Sorrell, chief executive of WPP

    Martin Sorrell, chief executive of WPP

  • Moray MacLennan, worldwide chief executive of M&C Saatchi

    Moray MacLennan, worldwide chief executive of M&C Saatchi

  • Peter Souter, chairman of TBWA\London

    Peter Souter, chairman of TBWA\London

  • Robert Senior, worldwide chief executive, Saatchi & Saatchi

    Robert Senior, worldwide chief executive, Saatchi & Saatchi

  • Simon Daglish, group commercial director, ITV

    Simon Daglish, group commercial director, ITV

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After Campaign reported that Saatchi & Saatchi chairman Kevin Roberts has resigned in the wake of his controversial gender diversity comments, one Twitter user called him out on another offence: manspreading.

Which made us think: that pose seems all too familiar.

Manspreading is the term coined for men who sit with their legs wide apart and take up extra space. Anti-manspreading campaigns have cropped up in places like New York, where the Metropolitan Transit Authority launched ads urging men to sit with their legs together on the subway. 

In the gallery above, Campaign collects examples of manspreading that have appeared in our pages over the years. While you have a laugh, it’s worth noting the deeper reason manspreading annoys some people: it mirrors men taking up a disproportionate amount of space elsewhere, from the boardroom to adland’s own creative departments. 

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