American Airlines partners with The Week to promote London-New York business class route

American Airlines has launched a campaign with The Week, the Dennis Publishing title, to promote its London to New York business class route.

American Airlines: teams up with The Week to promote London-New York route
American Airlines: teams up with The Week to promote London-New York route

The "going for great" campaign will see 160,000 The Week US issues being delivered to UK subscribers, and 12,000 copies being distributed in Canary Wharf.

The US edition will include an American Airlines cover wrap and content aimed at UK readers. There will also be tailored content on

David Weeks, the executive director – head of advertising at The Week UK, said: "The partnership between American Airlines and The Week applies innovative, multi-platform thinking to a strong media campaign, showcasing perfectly how a brand can work in tandem with a media owner to achieve a truly creative campaign."

The campaign will begin tomorrow and includes creative designed by Dennis Publishing across print, online and digital editions of The Week. Universal McCann Manchester was employed as the media agency.

Steve Davis, the director of international marketing at American Airlines, said: "We are keen to showcase our market-leading business class transatlantic product to high value individuals and The Week demographic fulfils that.

"As a pioneering airline that introduced the airport lounge concept and loyalty programmes to the aviation industry we are pleased to be the first brand to form a media partnership like this."

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