AMV hires Goodchild for new events and broadcast arm

Abbott Mead Vickers BBDO is launching an experiential, events and live broadcast unit called AMV Live and has hired Sarah Goodchild to run the department.

Goodchild: produced experiential work for companies such as Sony
Goodchild: produced experiential work for companies such as Sony

Goodchild joined AMV last week from Exposure’s New York office, where she was a freelance events director. She reports to Ian Pearman, the AMV chief executive.

She has spent the past decade producing experiential campaigns for companies including Sony, Jack Morton and Inca.

At AMV, Goodchild is tasked with setting up and expanding AMV Live, which is expected to grow to comprise ten staff, including producers, scenic designers, technical managers and experiential specialists. 

Pearman said: "We’re seeing a huge appetite for experiential work and AMV Live will further bolster our ability to deliver that work in a best-in-class way."

Most recently, Goodchild worked with Converse on the brand’s "made by you" campaign to launch the Chuck Taylor All Star II range of shoes globally.

Before moving into production, Goodchild was a performer, appearing in The Prime Of Miss Jean Brodie at the National Theatre and An Ideal Husband for the English Theatre Company. She has also appeared in the "cleaner closer" ad campaign for the soap powder Daz.

Goodchild said: "The culture of this agency is extremely forward-thinking and this, coupled with the opportunity to work with great brands, is a fabulous opportunity."


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