ANALYSIS: iSPY - www.globalstreetscapes.com

GlobalStreetscapes aims to provide innovative media types with ’fresh intelligence from the global urban marketplace’ and resembles something of a Dazed & Confused and Marketing hybrid.

GlobalStreetscapes aims to provide innovative media types with

’fresh intelligence from the global urban marketplace’ and resembles

something of a Dazed & Confused and Marketing hybrid.



The monthly online magazine is put together by a group of journalists

based in West London, who receive tips from ’a global network of

Streetscapers’. We are never told exactly who these Streetscapers are

(reporters, ad agency staff, media studies geeks ...?), but they work as

cultural jackdaws, gathering together clever bits of marketing.



The site is divided into three channels - global pulse, global energies

and outer limits - although I couldn’t see much difference between

them.



Inevitably when you are focusing on innovative advertising techniques,

you will find yourself covering specialist areas such as ambient media,

PR stunts and shock advertising.



The writing is precise and punchy but, in common with a lot of online

material, lacks depth. It is also uniformly approving of marketing folk

- I was interested to read that advertisers such as Nike are sponsoring

dust jackets on school books in the US, but I was surprised that the

writer did not spend a line or two debating the moral implications of

such a controversial strategy.



More importantly, the Streetscapers do not do their homework. They show

us the clever stunts but fail to name the people behind them. For

instance, I was intrigued to see that The Sunday Times had featured Lara

Croft in its ’Day in the life of ...’ section - but which PR agency

talked the paper into doing it?



Design-wise, the site looks as cool as you’d expect, although the

over-use of scroll bars gets irritating. Strangely for an advertising

magazine, it doesn’t seem to carry any ads, but when the subscription

fee is pounds 240 for 12 monthly online reports (the first 1,000 members

get a 50 per cent discount), it clearly doesn’t need them.



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