ASA rules in favour of Barnardo’s heroin ad

Advertising watchdogs have refused to back the chorus of protest over a shock ad by Barnardo’s showing a baby about to inject heroin.

Advertising watchdogs have refused to back the chorus of protest

over a shock ad by Barnardo’s showing a baby about to inject heroin.



Despite the refusal of a number of newspapers to carry the ad, the

Advertising Standards Authority has ruled that the charity’s tactics

were justified in order to highlight the seriousness of drug abuse and

threw out 28 complaints that it was offensive.



The ASA’s verdict comes just two weeks after another ad in the campaign,

showing a child about to kill himself by stepping off a building, was

named best charity ad at this year’s Campaign Press Awards, winning a

silver award for Bartle Bogle Hegarty.



The ASA has also defended Ford against charges by the Department of

Trade and Industry that the company failed to honour a price pledge.



The DTI took action after a national newspaper ad last year which ran

while car makers were under siege over allegations of ripping off

British customers.



Young & Rubicam produced the ad which took the form of a message to

current and future Ford customers from Ian McAllister, the company’s

chairman and managing director.



McAllister said that Ford was not planning to reduce prices but, if it

had to do so to remain competitive, it would refund the recommended

retail price maintenance difference to customers buying a new model from

authorised UK Ford dealers.



The DTI claimed that the company had reduced the price of some models

but had refused to reimburse the difference to customers who had bought

them at the original price.



But the ASA said it believed the ad made clear the terms of the promise

and that the company had kept to it.



Meanwhile, Sky TV has promised the ASA that it will review its

procedures for obtaining and clearing pictures for use in its ads after

a complaint from a woman that a photograph of her had been used in a

national press ad without her permission.



The woman said she had been ’upset and embarrassed’ by the ad, produced

by St Luke’s, which featured two elderly ladies talking on a park bench.