BACKBITE

What a relief. Just as I’m about to leave behind the interesting and complex angst of being 30 for the nondescript down-hill slope of the thirtysomething, Emap has invented a new demographic to make me feel better.

What a relief. Just as I’m about to leave behind the interesting

and complex angst of being 30 for the nondescript down-hill slope of the

thirtysomething, Emap has invented a new demographic to make me feel

better.



I am now, officially, in middle youth. My body may shy away from such

embarrassing optimism but my ever juvenile mind embraces the compliment

with unashamed glee.



Apparently, we women in our middle youth (the tag’s already beginning to

fit me like a pair of Wolford Lycra tights) believe in style, passion

and humour. Emap has devised identifying traits - we spend so much on a

haircut that we have to lie, gracefully, to our partner; we won’t go to

the pub unless we can sit down - and created a new magazine, Red, to

suit the stereotype.



Yet again a publishing house claims to have found the key to access the

hearts and minds of the disenfranchised female reader of a certain age.

The last time we Campaigners got this excited was when Wagadon’s Frank

made its debut, only to be met with delicately wrinkled noses on the

Campaign news desk and resigned shrugs as we all returned to Vanity

Fair, reluctantly admitting that the Americans do it best.



But Emap’s taking no chances. Red has been in development for two years

- yes, two whole years. Back then I was a tender 28, Take That were

still wetting pubescent knickers, Channel 5 was full of potential and

Christine Walker was Zenith.



The problem with boasting that your new magazine has been two years in

the planning is not only that things change an awful lot in two years,

but that research can poison creativity. I don’t like the idea of Red

because it smacks of formula, putting potential readers into a neat box.

At a time when the women’s magazine market needs a fix of flair and

innovation, Emap could well be in danger of producing a made-to-order

title that fits few real women.



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1 Job description: Digital marketing executive

Digital marketing executives oversee the online marketing strategy for their organisation. They plan and execute digital (including email) marketing campaigns and design, maintain and supply content for the organisation's website(s).