BACKBITE

Here’s an interesting brief. It’s for a malt whisky, Glenfiddich, which is going on to TV for the first time. It wants to move its image away from traditional tweedy values and into more emotional territory. An ad is created, as reported in Campaign last week. The storyline centres on a father and son. The son, a doctor, delivers the voiceover and explains the history behind the unhappy relationship. The father, once a professional boxer, is attempting to heal the rift via a holiday with his son in the boxing Mecca, Las Vegas. The scenes are intercut with the son at work, and boxing.

Here’s an interesting brief. It’s for a malt whisky, Glenfiddich, which

is going on to TV for the first time. It wants to move its image away

from traditional tweedy values and into more emotional territory. An ad

is created, as reported in Campaign last week. The storyline centres on

a father and son. The son, a doctor, delivers the voiceover and explains

the history behind the unhappy relationship. The father, once a

professional boxer, is attempting to heal the rift via a holiday with

his son in the boxing Mecca, Las Vegas. The scenes are intercut with the

son at work, and boxing.



Just a word of warning for the agency, McCann-Erickson. The British

Medical Association has simultaneously but coincidentally unveiled an

anti-boxing film, also reported in Campaign last week, designed to

challenge the legitimacy of the sport.



The second ad, by DMB&B, opens on what looks like a conker fight. Later,

the scene is lit to reveal that the game is being played not with

conkers, but with human brains. It’s a powerful film, and it has the

support of two media owners, Cinema Media and Pearl and Dean, which are

giving the airtime for free.



The final irony is, of course, that NABS, the charity that exists to

help punch-drunk advertising people, makes most of its money from its

boxing night. This year’s event raised a staggering pounds 551,000. It’s

a truly awesome amount, and much needed for NABS’s good work in the

business. Unfortunately, it’s also a truly awful way to raise it, as the

BMA and most people who go to the evening, will testify.



Contrary to popular wisdom, I’m sure most boxers are nice people and

I’ve heard boxing described as a harmless channelling of aggression. All

the same, I wonder if I am alone in thinking that there is something

wrong about a script featuring a sport that champions reducing your

opponent to such a state that he can no longer stand or defend himself?



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1 Job description: Digital marketing executive

Digital marketing executives oversee the online marketing strategy for their organisation. They plan and execute digital (including email) marketing campaigns and design, maintain and supply content for the organisation's website(s).