Backbite

A fairy story: once there was a big brand, a nice brand, a brand that had lived happily for many years in its market, respected by its neighbours, cherished by its kin, who had nurtured it from a puny little brand into a rippling hunk of a brand, and they were very proud of it.

A fairy story: once there was a big brand, a nice brand, a brand

that had lived happily for many years in its market, respected by its

neighbours, cherished by its kin, who had nurtured it from a puny little

brand into a rippling hunk of a brand, and they were very proud of

it.



Then, one day, the gods decreed that the brand was far too happy and

successful for its own good, that it should be stripped of its heritage

and thrust back into the world to start afresh with a silly new name

that nobody understood or liked.



The poor brand was forced to build a new life for itself, but it had

become the subject of great teasing and disrespect.



People laughed at its new identity and soon forgot the old brand which

they had so cherished. Friendless and unloved, the brand slunk away,

broken and humiliated.



If the brand belonged to one of your clients, you’d never advise them to

let it happen, would you? And surely the same would go if it was one of

your own brands? Strangely enough, it seems not. Last week, 20/20 Media

announced that it was to throw off its rather nifty name in favour of -

don’t laugh now - BJK&E Media. Doesn’t have quite the same ring about

it, does it? Bit like Mediavest, the soon-to-be new name for the Media

Centre, about which there has already been much sniggering.



Now, I know that there was a time when the Media Centre and 20/20 meant

a big fat zero to people, but a lot of hard work and quite a few

new-business coups helped turn the empty monikers into valuable brands

of which their employees and even clients were proud.



Of course, given the globalisation of the ad business, I’d argue

vehemently for the need for unified branding. But it’s one thing

throwing away a great brand name and quite another replacing it with

something really rather silly