BACKBITE

Campaign prides itself on smelling a con a long way off. So how did we fail to spot the whiff of fakery on that letter from Anthony Mirabel about Andrew Cracknell being a model of civility who could rescue advertising from the derision of the City and Fleet Street (Campaign, 13 September)? No excuses.

Campaign prides itself on smelling a con a long way off. So how did we

fail to spot the whiff of fakery on that letter from Anthony Mirabel

about Andrew Cracknell being a model of civility who could rescue

advertising from the derision of the City and Fleet Street (Campaign, 13

September)? No excuses.



Perhaps we’d got wind of the latest media centralisation and were too

busy trying to whip up enthusiasm.



Watching pseudonymous writers scrabbling to outdo each other with their

sometimes witty, sometimes poisonous letters has become a new office

sport for us.



This week’s corker came from one Miss Bunty Beamish writing from La

Poule au Pot, a pricey but sleazy restaurant in Victoria favoured by

people conducting illicit affairs. Bunty wants to add another name to

the dwindling band of creative directors who do not feel that a passing

Liam Gallagher impression is a pre-requisite for the job. She is

referring, of course, to the ‘witty and erudite’ Gerry Moira, who can

not only ‘charm the nuts off a moving wildebeest at 40 yards, but is

also a major babe magnet’.



This offers us a chance to explain Campaign’s two-tier letters

structure. There are the I-did-it-first-I-wrote-it-first-I-art-directed-

it-he-pinched-my-idea sort, which we lump in with the PR-generated

drivel and anything to do with creative independents. Then there are the

more interesting sort, concerning foot stamping by Tony Brignull,

Richard Phillips and Paul Weiland plus anything from our new collection

of pseudonymous writers - Messrs Mirabel, Beamish, Fournier, Chestnut et

al. So now you know.



We believe that the letters page, far from being hijacked by clever-dick

copywriters as someone suggested last week, is a model for any business

magazine in making its industry seem a lot more interesting than it

really is. The only moral is, if a letter about somebody in advertising

seems too good to be true, it probably is.



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