BACKBITE

The most fascinating thing about last week’s D&AD awards was the fact that the dual-venue ’experiment’ received such a resounding thumbs-down from the creative community. ’Do you know how to spell crap?’ thundered one creative director. ’It’s got one P!’ And the cats from Saatchis did not let the theft of two pencils (Alex won’t be cross if you send them back immediately) and a creative director’s credit card (ditto young Mr Kean) tarnish the enjoyment of their shed-full of awards.

The most fascinating thing about last week’s D&AD awards was the

fact that the dual-venue ’experiment’ received such a resounding

thumbs-down from the creative community. ’Do you know how to spell

crap?’ thundered one creative director. ’It’s got one P!’ And the cats

from Saatchis did not let the theft of two pencils (Alex won’t be cross

if you send them back immediately) and a creative director’s credit card

(ditto young Mr Kean) tarnish the enjoyment of their shed-full of

awards.



But some of the complaints about the night are less excusable, and even

less explicable, such as the people who called the event an unmitigated

disaster while staying until 3am, dancing their socks off and turning up

for work late the next day.



And boiling in oil is too good for all of you who’ve been burbling on

for years about the industry’s premier awards night not being inventive

enough, and who now are longing for the Grosvenor House Hotel - complete

with its surly East European waiters, its brown carpets, its drink

supplies that inexplicably dry up without warning and its Come on Eileen

groovy discotheque. Give me Boy George on the decks in his Philip Treacy

hat, any day.



I hope D&AD responds to its critics in two ways. First, by sending us a

letter or an opinion piece. Second, by setting up a working party to

crack one of the hardest briefs in town: how to stop you lot showing

zero respect for your peers’ work as they trudge up to the awards stage

to receive their pencil, while keeping the 1,400-strong crowd in one

room, giving it a drink before 9.30pm and showing the work on a

decent-sized screen. Separating design and advertising is one obvious

way to make the event more manageable.



Me, I had a brilliant time, but then who could fail to enjoy the racy

company of John Bartle on one side and big Bruce Crouch on the other?



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