BBH uses Kung Fu for Irish Murphy’s

Bartle Bogle Hegarty launches its second Irish commercial for bottled Murphy’s Irish Stout this week with an off-the-wall, 100-second epic based on the kitsch 70s TV programme, Kung Fu.

Bartle Bogle Hegarty launches its second Irish commercial for

bottled Murphy’s Irish Stout this week with an off-the-wall, 100-second

epic based on the kitsch 70s TV programme, Kung Fu.



The spot, ’parsnip’, opens on a miserable old oriental man sitting on a

bleak hillside and spinning a parsnip on the ground. Then the action

flashes back to the man in his youth as he fulfils a number of Kung

Fu-style physical and mental challenges.



His last task, set him by six Samurai warriors, is to knock back a

bottle of Murphy’s by picking up the bottle in their trademark style.

Sadly he fails, his bottle crashing spectacularly to the floor.



In the last scene, we return to an image of the broken old man

desperately practising the manoeuvre with his trusty parsnip.



’Parsnip’ was written by Hugh Todd and art directed by Adam Scholes, the

team responsible for the first Murphy’s ad. It was directed by Steve

Reeves through Brave Films and filmed on location in Victoria,

Australia.



Murphy’s market share of the Irish stout sector is now about 5 per cent,

while the market leader, Guinness, commands about 90 per cent. However,

Murphy’s recently recorded its strongest sales performance and the

brewer’s managing director, Marien Kaakebeeke, has attributed the growth

to BBH’s cult debut Irish ad campaign for the brand. The campaign

featured a group of Japanese Samurai warriors who were shown arriving in

a line at a bar, drinking bottles of Murphy’s and leaving - while a

Guinness drinker drummed his fingers on the bar waiting for his pint to

settle.



’Parsnip’ will run head to head with the ’big pint’ drive used by

Guinness in Ireland and created by HHCL and Partners. HHCL repositioned

Guinness in its debut work which featured three wise men pondering ’the

big conundrum’.



Both campaigns are aimed at 18- to 24-year-olds.