Billett research warns over TV ad scheduling

Mainstream TV advertisers are in danger of being saddled with the less desirable, older, downmarket TV viewers unless they learn how broadcasters manage their advertising airtime inventory, a new study of TV advertising warned this week.

Mainstream TV advertisers are in danger of being saddled with the

less desirable, older, downmarket TV viewers unless they learn how

broadcasters manage their advertising airtime inventory, a new study of

TV advertising warned this week.



According to the report from the Billett Consultancy, the more desirable

audiences such as AB men are sold to the highest-paying advertisers,

which means that blanket users of the TV advertising medium are often

left with those audiences that the niche advertisers don’t want.



The study also found that advertisers must learn to exploit the media

owners’ inventory management to gain a competitive advantage. Although

the notion of inventory management is not new, the report states that

media owners have now developed the system to such a high degree of

sophistication that they can dictate the schedule an advertiser can

buy.



John Billett, chairman of the Billett Consultancy, said: ’The inventory

management systems have become focused on delivering targeted schedules.

This means that the stable supporter of the medium, who is trying to

reach large numbers of broad target audiences, now gets saddled with an

older, downmarket targeted schedule.’



Using inventory management, broadcasters can keep a tight rein on which

advertisers can buy into specific programmes, whether an ad will appear

in a centre break rather than an end break and if an ad campaign appears

in a higher than average proportion of late peak airtime.



For example, an advertiser targeting 16- to 34-year-old men buying

airtime in late peak will get 76 per cent of its airtime in centre

breaks, compared to 60 per cent for an advertiser also buying late

peaktime but targeting adults.



Male targeted brands achieve higher first-in-break positions than female

targeted ones, while 16- to 34-year-old targeted brands have more

first-in-break slots than ABC1 housewife brands.



Become a member of Campaign from just £46 a quarter

Get the very latest news and insight from Campaign with unrestricted access to campaignlive.co.uk plus get exclusive discounts to Campaign events

Looking for a new job?

Get the latest creative jobs in advertising, media, marketing and digital delivered directly to your inbox each day.

Create an Alert Now

Partner content

Share

1 Job description: Digital marketing executive

Digital marketing executives oversee the online marketing strategy for their organisation. They plan and execute digital (including email) marketing campaigns and design, maintain and supply content for the organisation's website(s).