Boost for agencies as home spending rises

Rising property values have restored the confidence of Britain’s consumers - but they are demanding more from advertisers to help them make informed choices about what they buy.

Rising property values have restored the confidence of Britain’s

consumers - but they are demanding more from advertisers to help them

make informed choices about what they buy.



Research commissioned by Travis Sennett Sully Ross cites the surge back

to health of the home improvement sector as the most dramatic signal

that people have shaken off their reluctance to spend.



The result has been a switch over the past two years away from tactical

advertising, as companies re-dedicate themselves to long-term

brand-building.



’For agencies, it’s really good news,’ Peter Travis, the agency’s

chairman, said.



The research - part of an ongoing pounds 100,000 programme by the agency

which began as a monitor of the recession’s effects on consumer

behaviour - presents its most optimistic picture since its first

findings in 1991.



It suggests consumers are now ready to spend across a broad range of

sectors, particularly in home improvements - which has always been a

sensitive barometer because its success is heavily dependent on the

health of the property market. According to the survey, carried out by

RSGB among 2,000 adults across the country in March, 38 per cent of

consumers said they would spend more on improving their homes.



Similar evidence of returning confidence is found in other markets,

including holidays, where 31 per cent of those questioned expected to

spend more, clothes and footwear (28 per cent), eating out (18 per cent)

and tourist attractions (16 per cent).



But the research also indicates that consumers are looking for relevant

advertising which will help them make up their minds about what they

want before they go to buy it.



’We’ve reached ’choice overload’ and people aren’t enjoying it,’ Travis

said. ’Twenty years ago there was not enough choice. Now there’s too

much and consumers are looking to brands as beacons that will see them

through.’



Craig Kleber, the agency’s planning director, who collated the research,

said: ’It’s never been more important for advertising to be feeding the

brand rather than merely feeding on itself.’



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