Cadbury £6.5m Spots v Stripes campaign takes off

Cadbury is ploughing £6.5m into its latest 'Spots v Stripes' campaign, which promotes its sponsorship of the London 2012 Olympic Games and Paralympic Games, and its new wafer chocolate bar.

The campaign, 'Race Season', will launch tomorrow with 60- and 10-second TV spots, which will run for seven weeks.

Created by Fallon, the 'Race Season' sets nine challenges that prompt people to complete everyday tasks at a quicker than normal pace, and offers competitors the chance to set a world record.

The £6.5m campaign marketing spend, part of an overall £50m invested by Cadbury in the 'Spots v Stripes' initiative, is split between TV advertising, digital, events, community programmes, PR and outdoor advertising.

Digital activity includes online games, Facebook ads, VoD, and SEO, alongside a national outdoor advertising campaign.

Norman Brodie, Cadbury London 2012 general manager, said: "We were delighted with how quickly the Cadbury 'Spots v Stripes' campaign took the nation by storm in 2010, and we are excited by the prospect of continuing the fun in 2011 with the new 'Race Season'.

"The campaign's success to date shows that people really enjoy taking part in some game-playing fun. 'Race Season' continues the fun with a series of challenges, which can be played both online and offline, giving everyone the chance to get involved. Let's play our way to London 2012."

The executive creative directors on the campaign included Chris Bovill and John Allison. Art direction was by Stuart Hallybone and Emily Cussins, and the copywriter was James Woods.

The production company was Blink and the ad was directed by Andreas Nillson. PHD handled media.


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