CAMPAIGN CRAFT: CRAFT SECRETS - How JWT recreated a 60s movie scene for Dairylea cheese. Old techniques guarantee the authenticity of the fur bikini shot. By Jade Garrett

Ray Harryhausen, the animator responsible for the cult 60s movie, One Million Years BC, had 90 minutes to tell his story. Mark Nunneley, the director of the Kraft Jacob Suchards Dairylea Dunkers ad, ’dinotime’, had just 30 seconds to tell his.

Ray Harryhausen, the animator responsible for the cult 60s movie,

One Million Years BC, had 90 minutes to tell his story. Mark Nunneley,

the director of the Kraft Jacob Suchards Dairylea Dunkers ad,

’dinotime’, had just 30 seconds to tell his.



The commercial for the new product, through J. Walter Thompson,

recreates a scene from One Million Years BC which starred Raquel Welch.

The ad shows a curvaceous beauty, clad only in a fur bikini, fleeing the

clutches of a giant ’tyrannosaurus rex’ - who eventually grabs the

heroine and dunks her in his pot of Dairylea cheese. The ad also comes

complete with a Hollywood-style voiceover which announces: ’The Dairylea

inside new Dairylea Dunkers is so delicious and creamy you’ll want to

dunk almost anything into it ...



however, we recommend you use the breadsticks provided.’



At this point, the dinosaur realises his mistake, goes all goofy and

starts dunking the breadsticks instead. Nunneley, who directed the film

through Bermuda Shorts, is now at RSA. The spot was written and art

directed by Siggi Halling and David Mackersey.



The volcanic island of Lanzarote - the setting for both the original

movie and the Dairylea ad - posed problems for the production team. In

Harryhausen’s day, there was just one hotel on the island; today it’s

swarming with tourists. The rugged landscape was hazardous for the

Racquel Welch lookalike, who needed constant first aid attention as the

script demanded that she repeatedly threw herself on the ground. Casting

was affected by the Equity dispute and a Spanish actress was eventually

hired.



The ad’s production involved a mixture of live action and animation.



The live-action footage was projected on to a screen in the studio,

while the dinosaur was animated in the foreground. The film crew had to

bear in mind a sense of scale to keep the girl in proportion with the

dinosaur. The technique used was so old, a projector had to be built for

the job. When it was finished, the film needed to be downgraded, so it

was scratched and the contrast altered at Framestore to create an

outdated appearance. The whole production process took just over three

months.



The dinosaur was made at the Puppet Factory in Bristol and the process

took a team of ten almost five weeks to complete. Keen that the

techniques should match those of the 60s, they opted for a latex base

when today a more modern material such as silicon would be used.



The hardest part was getting the initial clay sculpt right, so a

dinosaur expert, who had helped with the original drawings for the ad,

was brought in. The dinosaur had to look fake by today’s standards. This

meant the wires were inserted after the cast was set so that the model

would hold its position.



Then Bermuda Shorts altered the model to make it look more friendly and

less Jurassic Park-like. Harryhausen was on hand as a consultant

throughout the process.



And the cost of all this? ’More expensive than most I’ve worked on,’

Nunneley says.



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